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Introducing The White


The WHITE

 

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Introducing The White


The WHITE

 

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Built in 2013

Acrylic, 7075 + 6061 T6 aluminum, brass, cloth, chromally, copper, enamel, epoxy, glass, light-emitting diodes, leather, magnesium, nickel, pyrex, rubber, silver, springs, stainless mesh, stainless steel, steel, titanium, 1967 Works ‘Squish head’ Velocette Venom Thruxton engine, GP Carburettors, Avon Venom tires, 21” WM1 Avon, 19” WM2 Borrani. Archimedes mount.

33 x 30 x 73 in.
UNIQUE
 

 
 
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The White Process


Process

The White Process


Process

 
 

Every part of The White is critical to the function of the machine.

 
 
 
 
 
 
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The White History


ENGINE ORIGIN

The White History


ENGINE ORIGIN

 
 

At the heart of The White is a documented factory racing 1967 Velocette Venom Thruxton engine, an ultra-rare 'squish head', which has been massaged internally and polished externally. 

 

A Velocette Venom still holds the record for a 500cc 'single' engine averaging 100 miles per hour for 24 hours in an endurance race session, which it set in 1961.

 Legendarily Velocette racer, Arthur Lavington, who owned and raced The White's 1967 VMT 816RC engine.

Legendarily Velocette racer, Arthur Lavington, who owned and raced The White's 1967 VMT 816RC engine.

 

The power unit is a potent thing with pur sang lineage, around which a dynamic, space-race chassis was fabricated by hand, to exacting tolerances of beauty.

 
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The White Features


the white's chassis explores the relationship between the human body and the mechanical

The White Features


the white's chassis explores the relationship between the human body and the mechanical

 
 
 

The White's details, typical of Falcon, include unique mirror-image four-leading shoe front brakes, based on the original Velocette design, but designed and engineered to be lighter, slimmer, and more exacting.

 

The inverted forks are wholly Ian Barry’s design, as is their integrated headlamp and handlebar unit, with its distinctive oval headlamp, carved from a single chunk of aluminum.  

 
 

The underslung monoshock rear suspension is a surprise, freeing the rear wheel to move without apparent connection to the frame or seat.

 
 

The shock is compressed by a pair of swingarms sculpted as musculature, with an attached bellcrank, which slides between a pair of frame outrigger arms; all parts move between and around each other, with softened edges and hand-hollowed forms.  

 

The combined fuel / oil tank harkens in outline to familiar motorcycle parts, but is approached from the opposite direction; not a dented, factory-pressed convenience, but an extreme adaptation to its rider's embrace.  The tank is intimately human-centric in origin, but needs no person to complete it.

 THE KESTREL REWARDS SERIOUS SCRUTINY, AS EVERY DETAIL EXPOSES THE DEVILRY BEHIND ITS INSPIRATION
 

Fitting snugly behind its tank, in total contrast, is the one-bolt seat unit of extreme formal purity, which was likened by the LA Times art critic to ‘Brancusi’s Bird in Space’.

 

The swellings and hollows from the White’s headlamp to tail suggest a body of apparently liquid silver, balancing ferocity with peace, the raw and refined.

 
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The White Gallery


GALLERY

The White Gallery


GALLERY